Weekly Feature

2017-10-11 / Local News

Mural unveiled at Clarence Presbyterian Church celebrates bicentennial year


The Clarence Presbyterian Church kicked off its bicentennial celebration by unveiling an enormous mural that will command the wall of the Upper Fellowship Hall at the church’s 9675 Main St. location. 
Photo by Jim Smerecak. Purchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com The Clarence Presbyterian Church kicked off its bicentennial celebration by unveiling an enormous mural that will command the wall of the Upper Fellowship Hall at the church’s 9675 Main St. location. Photo by Jim Smerecak. Purchase color photos at www.BeeNews.com The 450 members of the Clarence Presbyterian Church kicked off a yearlong bicentennial celebration by unveiling an enormous mural that will command the wall of the Upper Fellowship Hall at the church’s 9675 Main St. location.

The project began as the idea of congregant and freelance artist Pat McKeighan, who designed the pictorial to tell the church’s story in paint-by-number fashion so that every family could participate in its creation. The project took a year to complete.

The church, now under the leadership of the Rev. Greg Hall, traces its roots to 1817. The history of both Clarence and Erie County are depicted in the mural’s three panels. According to McKeighan, the work is titled “200 Years of Welcoming Doors” and was named “to represent the church’s attitude toward people of all ages.”

“Individual scenes depict activities of the church including families coming to the church, ministers over the years, baptism, nursery school, food pantry, deacon visitations, shawl ministry, fruit baskets, music program, youth canoe trips, picnics in the park, corn roasts and more. There is even a bagpiper at the door of the church’s modern addition in tribute to the church’s Scottish heritage,” McKeighan added.

“The arched windows represent the sunrise shown in the stained glass panels of the second church built in 1956, and the cross with the symbol of the trinity is central to everything we do and how we live both then and now,” McKeighan said.

Because of the large scope of the project, a key core of seven painters, five carpenters and five members of the church’s maintenance crew were needed to complete the work and erect the mural over scaffolding that extended to the peak of the old church sanctuary. The project also will provide an acoustical benefit to the room.

Dedication of the mural followed worship on Sunday when a bagpiper led the congregation in a parade from the new sanctuary up the stairs to the Upper Fellowship Hall.

Return to top


Clarence Special Events 2017
Click for schedule